Sony X900C Review

Sony X900C Review

Sony X900C Review 680 382 Maye

In this day and age, we already live The ubiquitous internet connectivity has transformed virtually every appliance in the modern home into a smart system, and televisions are no exception. It is no longer enough to simply have a monitor we have rapidly transformed into an entertainment system and more. Nowadays, even having direct access to your entire library of online content and streaming services without the help of a set-top box is becoming standard. A smart TV that’s as smart as my cell phone is good, but is it more engaging? I spent the entire month of August watching my content on the Sony X900C, a ridiculously thin 4K LCD TV that costs $2,400 (MSRP) and has the Android TV operating system built in. It is not hyperbole to say that I am ridiculously thin. In spite of its slenderness, the X900C measures little more than 1.5 inches at its thickest point, and just 0.2 inches at its thinnest. It weighs less than 40 pounds, making it light enough for me to set up on my own. 65-inch version weighs 51 pounds and the 75-inch version weighs 74 pounds.) The stand can also be easily installed It only took me a few minutes to mount the pre-assembled feet on the back of the set and secure them with screws. All in all, I spent more time trying to fit all the foam packing bits back into the box than I did assembling it. I will examine the X900C in depth via its operating system, which is based on Android Lollipop, last year’s version of the platform. Having a Smart TV is about as revolutionary these days as passive 3D technology, so I will focus primarily on that aspect. It was quite simple to set up the initial setup. My Google credentials opened up after I connected to the Wi-Fi network in my home. As an existing Google Play subscriber, I had total access to my Music and Movie¬†

 

By simply logging into your Google account on the TV, you are able to access all of these services. In addition, since this is a Sony, users can also connect the TV directly to their Playstation Network and access their PS3/4 content. The set won’t do all that much for you if you’re already a big iTunes fan with most of your streaming content already on the platform — best to stick to Apple TV instead. It’s quite new to the TV scene that Android is available. Google initially included them in the Google Nexus Player at the end of 2014, but has since signed deals with Sony, Philips and Sharp to include them in a variety of TV models, and has also partnered with Razer and NVIDIA to bring gaming-centric streaming boxes to market. The Philips 2015 TV lineup comes with Android TV in 80 percent of models — everything from the 5500 series (which sells at about $1,100) all the way up to the flagship 9600 series (which will launch American readers, however, will have to wait until they’re available on the European market. It’s pretty straightforward in terms of Android TV’s user interface, with recommendations taking up the top third of the screen, apps taking up the middle section, and games topping off YouTube cat videos are also recommended from across the Google Play ecosystem whenever I turn on the set – music from my library, new releases from Play Movies, and new music albums. center portion of your home screen has a section for your apps. In this section, you can use any of the preinstalled streaming apps or download some The majority of things I needed to download I easily cast directly from my mobile device to the TV, since anything I couldn’t install directly — like Crunchyroll — I could do from my mobile device just as easily. It didn’t even need a Chromecast (only the times the Chromecast wouldn’t work — see below for more details). There are a lot of the same popular games that I already play on my phone in the game section. It is very simple to mirror the tablet screen to the TV in order to play Clash of Clans on the 55-inch screen. However, I may just as easily install the tablet directly on the set and use an Android controller instead. There are some games, such as the shameless Frogger ripoff, Crossy Road, which do not even require A traditional remote can guide your chicken along its perilous journey by using its directional buttons. You already have your Google Play account associated with your TV, so you’ll be able to sync any achievements you earn on the TV with the mobile app.

Considering that this TV runs Android, voice recognition is deeply integrated and is quite effective. Since the smart remote can be a bit finicky when looking up menus, being able to press a single button to launch Netflix, and be transported immediately to the streaming service’s home screen, is particularly handy. Despite its ease of use, voice search is so much more than just finding apps using your voice. In 1996, the Academy nominated the following movies for best picture Content starring specific actors, produced by specific directors, or even movies starring specific actors. I had no problems with the android TV OS, but there were some hiccups. Casting content from my Nexus 7 directly to the TV was a hit-or-miss experience, for instance. For Netflix and Hulu content, the player worked flawlessly, but for apps that weren’t pre-installed, such as Crunchyroll, the player would often mess up and skip the start of the video. The situation becomes impossible if I switch to a physical Chromecast, since I would have to use a separate input channel. I have also encountered an instance when the TV turned off the video (not the audio) on any content I tried to stream when the TV used Netflix or Hulu apps. For example, I could navigate the app’s interfaces all the way up to the point where I hit play, but the screen would then My problem could have been easily solved if I had unplugged the set, counted to ten, and then plugged it into the wall on its own, but not before I self-flagellated for apparently breaking the television that did not I have become accustomed to my Nexus 6 and Nexus 7 hard-rebooting themselves, but don’t get me wrong, they do occasionally fail. The fact that my TV did it added a whole new layer of stress to the situation. Upon realizing I could fix the “yes audio, no video” problem simply by unplugging the set, I decided to do so. As a whole, the X900C is a capable 4K TV. There are four HDMI ports (one of which supports MHL), an Ethernet port, three USB ports, an analog tuner, as well as various component hookups, as well as Screen Mirroring and WiFi Direct. The X900C also has It comes with two types of remotes, a traditional multi-button wand and a smart remote with voice control and gesture Additionally, the Sony Sideview app for iOS and Android devices is available, though it’s little more than a TV Guide on your phone, and it’s not something I would recommend. Thanks to its quartet of 7.5W speakers, the audio output of the X900C is pretty good. Unlike my neighbor, they’re not loud enough to rattle loose your fillings with overwhelming bass. The volume is more than enough to drown out his absurd need to run his table saw 15 feet from my window after hours. There is no noticeable difference in the image quality. There’s no way to increase the contrast ratio (the distance between the brightest white section and the darkest black section) on an edge-lit IPS display, especially when you’re watching a movie in an all-darkened In addition to handling 4K content adeptly, this set can stream 4K content over Wi-Fi as long as you can either access a large library of 4K Blu-ray movies or have a decent wireless connection, because I couldn’t tell the difference over my patchy wireless connection. X900C is priced at $2,400, which is expensive for a 55-inch set. Fortunately, one can be found for $1200 – $1800 online, which is 10 times less than the price for an entry-level 4K set at your nearest The LG curved 4K set retails for $1,800, which is roughly equivalent to the current street price of that TV but you lose the Android and PSN functionality. However, unless you’re searching for a hardcore reference model (like the Vizio R-Series) or something you can install in your dedicated home theater, the X900C sets a decent, modest benchmark, especially if you already use Android in your smartphone. A PlayStation owner won’t want to miss out on this set. Featuring a 178-degree viewing angle, but the low black levels mean you need to be as close to the front dead center as possible for best results . For regular TV, sports coverage and video games, it is more than capable, particularly when a motion algorithm is enabled.