Best 60 Percent Keyboard

Best 60 Percent Keyboard

Best 60 Percent Keyboard 680 453 Maye

Right now, there are a lot of gaming keyboards on the market. These keyboards are available in both black and white, wired or wireless, and with as many as a dozen key switches. Over the years, they have grown bigger and more complex, featuring media buttons and macro keys, as well as bright There have been instances in the past year of some manufacturers going in the opposite direction, introducing 60-percent keyboards that are cute and compact. But should we be buying them?

How many keys does a 60-percent keyboard have?

As an opening point, it’s worth noting that gaming keyboard configurations generally follow one of three different routes. Usually the full-size deck consists of between 100 and 110 keys, based on whether the manufacturer includes macro keys as well as media buttons. You’ll always find a function row along the top of the keyboard. The number pad sits on the far right side of the keyboard. Full-sized models work better for gamers since they allow them to perform multiple functions with just one push, and they can set up macros for activities that aren’t already integrated to their keyboard. Tenkeyless models have been available for a while The keyboards without the number pad on the right have these features. That’s all there is to The keyboard still has function keys and media controls, but it is narrower than the original because 17 keys are omitted. The number of keys is actually more than ten, but “seventeenkeyless” does not ring the same for some reason. If gamers need a little more space on their desk and don’t need a way to quickly enter numbers or do calculations (this is my number one use case for the right-hand pad), they might choose one of these.

60-percent keyboards are also available, in which 40 percent of the size of the standard keyboard is cut and there are only remove the number pad, but the function keys, along with arrow keys, and those weird system keys are gone, too, such as “print screen” and “home.” This is because those keys are only really useful when you There are certain computers that do not even support them. Using the function key, you can access these buttons on a keyboard that has 60 percent of the buttons The layout of hotkeys varies from company to company, so swapping between manufacturers like Razer, HyperX or Corsair will require you to learn the new layout. However, their height can be adjusted. The wrist rests do not even come with them. Raser just introduced a 65-percent keyboard, a configuration less common than the normal keyboard that keeps some keys but eliminates the rest to maintain a lower profile. This is probably the best option if you make heavy use of the arrow keys. Since I edit a lot of text, and some games may use them rather than the WASD keys for controlling characters, I need them.

What are the benefits of a 60-percent keyboard?

When so many functions are removed from a 60 percent keyboard, why would you purchase it? The number one reason is space, It’s especially nice if you eat or drink near your computer since the small size of a 60% keyboard makes it easy to push items out of the way. It’s also handy if you play games in tight areas or generally have a lot on your desk like I do. This keeps the keyboard cleaner, too, because I can easily wipe away crumbs. The smaller size, too, makes it a lot more portable, since a 60 percent keyboard takes up much less room than a laptop in your bag, but it does still weigh a bit. At least they have a lower-profile than standard decks, though if carrying around a mechanical keyboard is the most important factor in your selection, then you probably should not invest in one. A big feature that isn’t often talked about is the fact that all of the recent 60- (and 65-) percent decks use detachable USB-C cables. For those of us who switch workspaces frequently, you can leave a cord at each desk so you can plug in your keyboard quickly and easily. As someone who tests a lot of keyboards, it’s been a breeze to use the same cord for 60 percent

The best for most gamers: Razer Huntsman Mini

At the moment, the Huntsman Mini is the best of the major 60-percent keyboards on the market. Razer’s opto-mechanical switches are used, which I’ve not been too fond of in the past, but the company seems to have made some changes that make it much more comfortable to type on. Despite its smoothness and quick response time, it may not fit the needs of people who want a springy key feel. Since it isn’t a wireless keyboard, you’ll always need to keep a USB-C cable in your backpack if you plan on taking it with you. In addition to its white color, the Huntsman Mini is also available in LED mode, which allows you to customize the LED lights to better mesh with your home decor.

Pros

It is attractive, and the keys are well-placed A white color is available

Cons

Wireless access is not available A lot of people are not going to be fans of optomechanical

Runner up: HyperX Alloy Origins 60

Located on a metal baseboard, the HyperX Alloy Origins 60 mechanical keyboard is one of the most robust, sturdy options at 60%. It’s heavier than most other options on the market, so it has its shortcomings when it comes to keeping your travel bag light. It also earns points for being the only 60-percent keyboard that positions the secondary arrows at the bottom right of the deck where they’d normally be because it places them at the bottom right of the deck where you’d normally look for them, instead of hiding them

Pros

It is designed and constructed solidly it is cheaper than other options with 60 percent Arrow keys in the right places.

Cons

A heavy load There is no wireless access.

The best with arrow keys: Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini HyperSpeed

The Razer BlackWidow line has long been a favorite of our gaming audience here at Engadget, and the V3 Mini is no different. There are arrow keys and a row of miscellaneous keys on the right side of the keyboard that can act as macro buttons, and it’s a 65 percent keyboard, which means it has a 65 percent keyboard keyboard. You can choose between two switch options to suit different typing preferences, green and tactile or yellow and linear. However, it’s worth mentioning that the latter label is the company’s own term for it. Meanwhile, the V3 Mini displays its typing clearly to those nearby.

Pros

The switch can be configured in two ways WiFi is both 2.4 GHz and Bluetooth compatible The keyboard has keys that other keyboards don’t

Cons

This is an expensive model, with bulky borders at the bottom.

A cheaper but underwhelming option: Corsair K65 RGB Mini

I usually think Corsair makes decent keyboards, but I wouldn’t entirely agree with that statement about the K65 RGB Mini, its entry into the 60 percent In addition to its hollow plastic casing and keys that made ringing sounds when used, the materials were substandard for the company. Even so, it’s not a horribly bad accessory, and users already familiar with Corsair’s iCUE software might prefer to keep all of their accessories streamlined under the same interface than have to switch between them. However, if that is not a concern for you, the HyperX Alloy Origin 60 is both cheaper and better than the HyperX Origin 60.

Pros

It is powered by Corsair’s iCUE software. It feels good to press the key.

Cons

Materials that are cheap Typing experience that is noisy There is no wireless service.